Sun Star. St. Abbs & Eyemouth Voluntary Marine Reserve.
Sun Star.
Activities. Activities.
Ticker tape.
Dahlia Anemone.

Seaweed

Exploring the Seashore

Introduction
Pointer to current page.Seaweed
Sponges & Sea Anemones
Worms
Limpets & Sea Snails
Crabs & Barnacles
Spiny-Skinned Animals
Seashore Fish

Coastal Walks

Eyemouth to St. Abbs
Bird Watching

Sailing

Local Facilities
Map of Eyemouth Approaches

Photographic Competition

Splash-In Rules 2007
Splash-In 2006
Splash-In 2005
Splash-In 2004
Splash-In 2003
Splash-In 2002
Splash-In 2001
Previous Winners

As the tide ebbs the rocks are left blanketed in layers of slippy slimy seaweed, the marine equivalent of grasses bushes and trees. While plants on land have roots, seaweeds instead have a holdfast. The holdfast fixes the seaweed strongly to the rocks, however unlike roots it is not used to absorb water or nutrients.

Seaweeds come in many different shapes, sizes and colours. They can be found in distinctive zones between the high and low water marks. Each species is adapted to survive the particular levels of exposure, which include changes in salinity, light, humidity and temperature found with its zone.

The easiest to identify are a family of brown seaweeds known as Wracks. They each occupy specific zones between and once you have learnt to identify each member of the family you can work out where you are on the shore.

Many different animals eat seaweeds, others hide amongst the fronds (or leaves) and some live attached to them. While seaweed offers the perfect cover for seashore animals it also has several other uses that you may not be aware of. Seaweeds are used to help make lots of things for example ice cream, jelly, toothpaste, beer and dyes.


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Kelp Holdfast.

Kelp Holdfast.

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Bladder Wrack.

Bladder Wrack.

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Knotted Wrack.

Knotted Wrack.

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