Sun Star. St. Abbs & Eyemouth Voluntary Marine Reserve.
Sun Star.
Activities. Activities.
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Dahlia Anemone.

Limpets & Sea Snails

Exploring the Seashore

Introduction
Seaweed
Sponges & Sea Anemones
Worms
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Crabs & Barnacles
Spiny-Skinned Animals
Seashore Fish

Coastal Walks

Eyemouth to St. Abbs
Bird Watching

Sailing

Local Facilities
Map of Eyemouth Approaches

Photographic Competition

Splash-In Rules 2007
Splash-In 2006
Splash-In 2005
Splash-In 2004
Splash-In 2003
Splash-In 2002
Splash-In 2001
Previous Winners

Limpets

A Limpet is a Mollusc with a cone shaped shell. You can find limpets on all the rocky shores of the Marine Reserve. A limpet can clamp down on a rock very tightly using its large muscular foot. This ensures that the waves don’t knock it off even in the stormiest conditions. When the tide is out, its large foot forms a seal to make sure that it does not dry out.

Underside of the Common Limpet.
Underside of the Common Limpet.

Limpets move about the rocks feeding by using their long, hard, file like tongues to scrape off tiny plants. You can often see the feeding trail of the limpets as a zigzag pattern on the rock. After feeding each limpet will return to the place in the rock where it set out. A limpet can live for many years and it always returns to the same point. Over the years it makes an oval mark on the rock known as a ‘home scar’.

Sea Snails

Snails are also Molluscs, but with spiral shells, which come in many shapes, sizes and colours. Many different species of snail are found on the shores of the Marine Reserve. On the rocky shores you will find some in cracks on the rocks, some under boulders or in rock pools, and others on seaweed.

When you pick up a shell with a snail inside, it hides by drawing itself into the shell, closing the entrance with a horned plate. If left along they will come out of their shells and begin to move about. Similar to limpets, snails have a muscular foot that they use to glide over the rocks leaving a sticky trail of mucus behind, which can sometimes be seen.

Images by Jim Greenfield.


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Limpets in their Home Scars.

Limpets in their Home Scars.

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Blue Ray Limpets.

Blue Ray Limpets.

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Whelk.

Whelk.

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Painted Topshell.

Painted Topshell.

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